Fonts

RULES AND WAYS TO CHOOSE THE FONTS TO REPRESENT YOUR BRAND

What do fonts say about you?

Choose your fonts carefully

Fonts are great! There are probably few people who have not sat down at a computer and simply played with font choice just to see what looked best. There are so many font choices, that it can become impossible to find the best combo. The question is, is your font choice that important? IT IS! Words are the ones who present your content and fonts have a profound effect on how the reader perceives it.

Your designs is only as good as your typography. Whether you are creating a web page, social media graphics, flyers, logos, apps etc, the fonts are the thing that puts everything together. If the design is not catchy, people will not read your content, let alone consider buying anything from you.

In just a few words, typography is the art of arranging text in a legible, striking and engaging way. For this, you need a lot of work, experimentation and technique. It means so much more than just finding a pretty font and using it. The arrangements are strategic and there are quite a few characteristics you need to take into consideration, such as typefaces, fonts, hierarchy, consistency, alignment, whitespace, the colors etc.

What is great typography?

1. It Catches the Eye.
2. It's easy to read.
3. It facilitates Brand Recognition
4. Adds Personality and Feeling
5. The vital information should always stand out.


Don’t try to stuff a lot of information at once. If you have more than one point to make, use the hierarchy technique to organize your ideas.

Avoid using too many different fonts. Keep your choices to a maximum of 3 fonts, but if you can use only two, that’s even better! This prevents any confusion.

Keep an eye on spacing and justification. If the spacing (kerning) between fonts doesn’t look harmonious, start again. For many people, bad kerning could go unnoticed, but for designers and observant people, it can be quite distressing.

Yes, typography is far more complicated than most people would imagine. It’s an art, one that may take years to master. But when done well, it creates brands, it grabs attention, and it conveys important messages in an artistic and unique way.

Font Basics

What you need to know

Terms breakdown

What is the difference between a typeface and a font?

A font is a part of a typeface. So if we have the 'Montserrat' family, that is the typeface. All the fonts belonging to it, like 'Montserrat Bold' and 'Montserrat Thin' added up constitute the 'Montserrat' family.

Is this important?

Unless you are a trained designer, you probably won't be able to see the difference between typefaces as much. 'Fonts' are largely used because all the software we use, like Microsoft Office or Emails have a 'Fonts' section, not 'Typeface' section. But it's a good anecdote for some. 

Serif vs Sans Serif, Which one to use?

Serif letters are drawn with features at the ends of their strokes. The serifs are the little feet we see in fonts like Times. These are some of the oldest type designs. The feet along the baseline help guide the eye from left to right, making them very ‘readable’ fonts.

Sans Serif (french for “without serifs”) are letters drawn with straighter lines and no feet. Their larger letterforms make them very legible, but can cause greater eye strain when used in long runs of text. Helvetica is considered the quintessential sans serif font.

What is Whitespace?

Whitespace refers to the empty space around objects or text, and can take the form of margins, padding, or just an uncluttered area. It creates a pleasing visual experience and can even draw attention to text. In the first box below, the text is crammed against the bounding box, making it hard to read. In the second box, the text has breathing room and the design even looks more stylish.

What is font kerning?

In typography, kerning is the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font, usually to achieve a visually pleasing result. Kerning adjusts the space between individual letter forms, while tracking (letter-spacing) adjusts spacing uniformly over a range of characters.

What are the 4 major font types?

Most typefaces can be classified into one of four basic groups: those with serifs, those without serifs, scripts and decorative styles. Over the years, typographers and scholars of typography have devised various systems to more definitively categorize typefaces – some of these systems have scores of sub-categories.

Font Facts

Little known facts

Fonts do More Than Transmit Words

Of course, when you are typing words on your computer, your ultimate goal is to transmit an idea to the people who will be reading them. The font you choose can have a profound effect on the people reading the words you type. So, the perceived meaning can change drastically depending on the font choice. Shapes are multi-sensory, meaning they affect more than one of your senses and can easily elicit emotions, even before we read the word. In fact, we react to font types every day, even when we are not aware of it. In fact, fonts can subconsciously tell us where to go and what to buy.

Believe it or not, research on fonts has been going on for more than 100 years! Although much of the data remains scientifically unproven, there are without a doubt, some sound conclusions that any logically-thinking person can make. For example, fonts that have a formal look, such as Helvetica, are taken more seriously than other fonts. When different people read the same material in that font, the information is generally believed and there are fewer disagreements among the readers. On the other hand, a more whimsical font, such as Comic Sans, has the opposite effect. The same material was not treated as seriously and there tends to be more disagreements about the content. 

Serif vs. Non-Serif Fonts

In the age-old debate about fonts, the topic of serif and non-serif fonts always seems to arise. Serif fonts are those that include a small line at the end of a stroke or letter. Non-serif fonts are those that do not include the extra line. It seems that many people have strong opinions about which type of font is better. The debate is often attributed to the legibility of each type of font. Several studies have concluded that serif fonts do not help to guide the eyes of the reader and they do not improve any cognitive identification of a letter. Sans-Serif fonts do not cause eye fatigue and they also do not have any display advantages on modern computer screens. So, despite strong opinions toward one or the other, there is no research to back the promotion of one over the other.

Why do Fonts Matter?

Fonts provide both a practical and aesthetic function. Also, certain fonts work better in certain applications than others do. The fonts you choose will tell present and potential customers a lot about your brand. If you have a business that is more formal and corporate-oriented, such as a law firm, you want to choose a more traditional, formal-looking font. However, if your business is more cheerful in nature, such as hosting kids’ birthday parties, you should use a whimsical font such as comic sans. Keep in mind that some fonts elicit a more trusting feeling than others do. You want to make sure you pick a font that does not turn customers away. 

Picking the Right Font for Your Business

Fonts provide both a practical and aesthetic function. Also, certain fonts work better in certain applications than others do. The fonts you choose will tell present and potential customers a lot about your brand. If you have a business that is more formal and corporate-oriented, such as a law firm, you want to choose a more traditional, formal-looking font. However, if your business is more cheerful in nature, such as hosting kids’ birthday parties, you should use a whimsical font such as comic sans. Keep in mind that some fonts elicit a more trusting feeling than others do. You want to make sure you pick a font that does not turn customers away. 

Picking the right font can be crucial to the success of your business. Here are some tips for choosing the perfect font.

Decide which characteristics you want your brand to convey. What are the most important qualities of your brand? And what is your brand’s personality? Or what does your business stand for? Once you answer these questions, you will know the direction you want to go.
Make sure your font style aligns with your brand’s character. Pick a font that exudes the same personality as your business. Whether your business is elegant and refined, whimsical, formal or family-oriented, there is a font that represents what you want to convey.
Make sure your fonts are readable. Of course, you want people to be able to read anything you put into print. So, choosing the right font is essential. Some fonts have letters and/or numbers that look strikingly similar, which can be confusing to readers. If you are looking for a good font to use, experiment a little bit and make sure all of the letters and numbers are distinguishable before you make your final choice.

Although it is seemingly a minor choice to make in comparison to everything else you need to decide for your business, picking the right font can have a tremendous effect on it. Before you make your final decision, make sure you try a few options and make sure the one you choose conveys the right message for your brand and is clearly readable. Keeping these factors in mind will help you make the perfect choice.

How Fonts Can Help your Business

It can grab your target market’s attention.
As mentioned earlier, fonts can evoke emotions and moods. The perfect font choice can set the tone for all your marketing strategies and project the mood or feeling that you’re aiming to send.

It creates a hierarchy.
Your content can be easily understood just by the layout of the fonts. Your reader will see what’s most important when you use different sizes and types of fonts. This will also make way for a good flow of information that’s easy on the viewers’ eyes.

It creates audience recall.
Especially when you use typography that’s customized for you, people will remember you with it and recognize you easily from your competition.

It makes for better readability.
Careless use of typography can result in cramped or cluttered presentations. People will most likely ignore you when the content is hard to read.

It creates consistency.
When used all over your marketing campaigns, fonts can give that professional and consistent look for a more harmonious design. It unifies your overall marketing strategies to make it more memorable.

INCREDIBLE FONT COLLECTIONS

Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Serif Fonts - Social Babe

Collection of 150 Serif Fonts

$4.99
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts
Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts

Collection of 320 Sans Serif Fonts

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Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 150 Script Fonts - Social Babe

Collection of 150 Script Fonts

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Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe
Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts - Social Babe

Collection of 168 Handwritten Fonts

$4.99

How to combine Fonts

Basic rules for combining your fonts

1. Choose complementary fonts.

Many fonts have distinct moods or personalities—serious, casual, playful, elegant. You want to make sure the moods of your font choices match the purpose of your design. For instance, a script or calligraphic typeface may be appropriate for a wedding invitation, but not for your business newsletter.

As is often the case with people, opposites tend to attract: “introverted” and “extroverted” fonts balance each other nicely when combined. So if you have a distinctive font with a “strong personality” (often referred to as a display font), pair it with something more neutral and conservative for a balanced design. 

Deciding whether two or more fonts complement each other can feel like something of a guessing game. You’ll often find yourself relying on instinct—a gut feeling, and that’s ok. If you make a point of noticing how fonts combine well (or not) out “in the wild”—on websites, in magazines, on store signs and product packaging—you’ll start to develop an eye for what works and what doesn’t.

2. Establish a visual hierarchy

Traditional publishing formats like newspapers and magazines offer good examples of how to apply a visual hierarchy to fonts. They combine fonts in a way that visually separates different textual elements like headlines, sub-headlines, body copy, and captions. Qualities such as size, boldness also known as “weight”, and spacing including leading—the space between lines, and kerning—the space between letters, all contribute to how the eye should navigate the page and what text should attract attention first.

A hierarchy can be established for any type of design, not just layouts with titles and body copy. When you’re picking fonts for a project, just think about what part you want viewers to look at first. Or here’s another way of approaching it: Decide what information is essential—what must stand out at first glance, like a company name, a headline, a special offer—and what is less important. Then, make your font style, size, and arrangement choices accordingly. The most important textual element is generally (though not always) the largest and the weightiest.

3. Create contrast

One of the main reasons that pairing serif and sans-serif fonts works so well is that it creates contrast. This idea of contrast brings together multiple concepts that you should be considering, including hierarchy and how fonts complement each other.

Contrast can be achieved in a number of ways, including through style, size, weight, spacing, and color, among others. In the example below, a bold, chunky font is paired with a tall, thin one—and although they’re almost complete opposites, they work nicely together in large part because they are so different. The differences help create distinct roles for each font, allowing them to stand out as individual pieces of information. The size of the date (in pink) is about twice the height of the page title (in white), so those skinny numerals don’t get lost; their larger size gives them enough presence to stand up against the bold headline.

4. Mix serifs and sans serifs

Running short on time and need to pick two fonts, quick? Try one serif and one sans serif. The two tend to work together well, particularly at contrasting sizes.

It’s worth noting here that, in the world of typography, there’s an ongoing debate about whether serif or sans-serif fonts are best in terms of readability. For large amounts of text, serif fonts are generally thought to move the eye along more effectively and increase reading speed, especially in print (though this obviously depends on the characteristics of the specific font used). On the other hand, sans-serif fonts are often favored for online/on-screen text due to their simplified letterforms that display more clearly at various screen resolutions.

5. Avoid pairing fonts that are too similar

Choosing fonts that are too similar (i.e., don’t have enough contrast) becomes problematic. You’ll have trouble establishing a hierarchy because the fonts aren’t visually distinguishable from each other. And any differences that are discernible may look more like a mistake than a purposeful choice.

But fonts don’t have to be exactly alike to be incompatible. Typefaces that are somewhat different but have comparable weights, proportions, and/or letter shapes may be similar enough to make your design look confusing and indistinct, especially when used at the same size—like the pair below, despite the fact that one has serifs and the other doesn’t. Here’s an easy way to test whether two or more fonts might be too similar: Place them side by side on your screen, then sit back a little and squint. If the fonts look basically the same, then that’s a good indication that your design could benefit from turning up the contrast between your type choices.

Font Pairings We LOVE

As you will notice, there are 4 colors for each scheme, out of which at least 1 is a neutral/ very faded color. That can be used as an extra background besides white/black.

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